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they will aspire. >> more with the publisher of conservativeblackchick.com tonight. >> now , a debate on elections in muslim countries following the arab spring. this was part of a daylong forum hosted by the tens of democracies. this is just over one hour. >> good morning everyone. thank you, bob, for that introduction and thank you all of you for coming out early this morning for what i think will be a lively debate. we are going to be asking the question if democracy is to triumph in the middle east, victories at the ballot box are unavoidable and essential. this is the motion we will be debating in the intelligence- squared format per requests from our panelists who have done this once already -- they have had a practice round. they have not had a chance of doing this, but i suspect, had probably had several scotches and talked about ways to defeat their foes. we know that this is a time of revolution in the middle east. it started with a fruit sell seller in tunisia and toppled a 230-year dictator that spread to egypt and the egyptian revolution was concern to the united states. egypt has lon
guessed at, the results of which played out in the numbers of election night. the nasty, anti-immigrant politics, the attitude toward that 47%, the failure to turn out the white male vote, the reason romney picked ryan, and the wild prelude to the clint eastwood performance. tonight right here on "hardball," the dark aroma of what lies now beneath the dirt so we can understand what it looks like to think and feel your way into an historic disaster. with me are jeff zeleny with "the new york times" and susan milligan who is contributing editor at "u.s. news & world report." you laugh. it's not funny. you both attended that harvard institute of policy forum. last week with top advisers from both the obama and romney campaigns. they just released, by the way, tonight, we have the audio recordings of that not filmed event. we have a real autopsy of what went on behind the scenes during the primaries, the conventions, and the general election on the romney side. let's start with the republican race for the nomination. romney's campaign manager matt rhoades was asked whether his can
area of national defense. and the election was nearly a month ago, but many states are still tallying their ballots. the united states election project is gathering some of that data and as found 28 states are reporting their official and final results. according to that samples size 59% of eligible voters cast their ballots this november and in nevada .6% voted for none of the above in the presidential race. >> that's the only state allowing that option. be right back. alright, in 15 minutes we're going to do the young turks. i think the number one thing that viewers like about the young turks is that we're honest. they know that i'm not bs'ing them with some hidden agenda, actually supporting one party or the other. when the democrats are wrong, they know that i'm going to be the first one to call them out. they can question whether i'm right, but i think that the audience gets that this guy, to the best of his ability, is trying to look out for us. [ ♪ theme ♪ ] [ music ] >> broadcasting across the nation, on your radio and on current tv this is "the b
election cycle, he was one of the strongest voices this he had would a lost our way -- that we'd lost our way in washington. jim is a kind, sincere man, an individual who is a joy to be around. when it comes to what's going on in america, jim understands that if we don't make some changes we're going to lose our way of life. that's what's driven him above all else, to try to keep our country a place to be place where you can be anything. i look forward to working with jim in the private sector. from a personal point of view, we've had a great ride together. it has been fun. it has been challenging, and i think we put south carolina on the map in different ways at different times, and to people back in south carolina, i hope if you get to see jim anytime soon, just say "thank you." because whether you agree with him or not, he was doing what he thought was best for south carolina and the united states. at the end of the day, that's as good as it gets. because if you're doing what you really believe in and you're not worried about being the most popular and people getting mad ought, then yo
as far as that road that is concerned whether it is the road map to elections as the ambassador was speaking to or a road map for the negotiations between the various disaffected elements in the north of bahrain to renounce violence and engage in an negotiations process. obviously if we get to a point of elections being held and being able to resume assistance with the forces, that will be an important step forward for the united states to be able to directly help the malian forces in addition to other contributing countries. european union, france, others have already begun to really engage with the malian forces, so it isn't as if there is an abstinence of support for them in the intervening period. >> what lessons have we learned, if i might, ms. dory and mr. gast, i think the mission just celebrated the 50th anniversary. we were actively engaged in the training a good thing as a part of the very probably democracy support and in trying to create and sustain a cultural democracy what lessons are there that we might learn going forward about political failures and more on dome
as they reelected angela merkel as the party leader. she will now stand in national elections at the end of next year. after being renamed cdu chairwoman, delegates stood and applauded for nearly eight minutes. >> 903 votes -- that is 97.94%. >> a landslide victory for angela merkel. the record results left the unusually unflappable leader of germany's conservatives struggling to find words. >> those who know me know that i am really overwhelmed and moved, and i would like to express my sincere thanks. >> merkel has been at the helm of the cd you since 2000, but her leadership has never received such a resounding endorsement. her popularity is at an all-time high, and her speech ahead of the vote struck a triumphant note. >> this coalition is the most successful government since germany's reunification. unemployment is at its lowest level since 1990, and employment levels are the highest they have ever been, creating work and security for millions of people and families. >> on the eurozone debt crisis, merkel called once again on brussels to impose strict budgetary discipline on eu member states
this program alone. >> and then this is not the only state because during this federal election there were two states that ended up on positive end of legalizing recreational marijuana. the other one being colorado. why do we not see a party there today? >> reporter: because they haven't made it legal yet. the governor there has to act before january 5th and then they will make it at some point legal to possess pot there as well. and then they'll have to go through the same process of setting up the rules to figure this out. advocates here firmly believe once you have the two states despite what the federal government may say, the cat will be out of the bag. jeangen other states will soon follow the tax revenues are one thing. they say it makes more sense rather than spending money on fighting petty crimes, use it to raise lots of money and use that money for education and other things. >> all right. thank you for that. clearly so many more questions, legal questions, and for that we'll skip over to our joey jackson, legal commentator who joins us live from atlanta now. i think one of the big
represented for our community in terms of a step forward. we are now elected lgbt peep to office and harvey was such an incredible trail blazer, not? in just getting elected, but in being a great leader and always holding his head high for our community. and i know when i was first sworn into office, one of the things that i always kept in mind was something that i understand harvey to have said, * that when you go into city hall, you walk up the central staircase. you don't walk on one of the side staircases because for our community, it is so important for us to walk up that central staircase and for us to be in the middle of everything and for everyone to know that we are here. and all these years later, we've made a lot of strides in the lgbt community, but we still have so much work to do around hiv issues, around our youth, around discrimination, around transinclusion, and all the things that we know that harvey had he been here today would still be working on and leading on. and, so, we have to keep doing our work. and frankly, we can't take for granted that queer people are going t
of his re-election and the fact he campaigned the issue at the core of these negotiations, raising rates on high income. this report i don't see as changing the dynamic much at all. it was one of these reports that both side could and did day care from it what they wanted to. even at 146,000, that's not at a level high enough to be bringing back into employment a lot of people that lost their jobs. gwen: there's a public dynamic, which we just say -- saw, the president and speaker. then we hope, we assume, they're a private dynamic going on. what do we know about that? >> if you talk to the speaker of the house and his statue they say there are negotiations going on between the speaker and the president. on thursday the staffs met and hashed some things out. i'm told they're going to continue talks through the weekend now, so there's something going on here behind the scenes. what we don't know but publicly they continue to fire off artillery barrageses. part of it is they can't admit they have a deal until they have one nailed down. what's been fascinating is to watch how quickly the d
election. sort of consolidated his republican conference behind him. david is right, is i think what we know is republicans are willing ultimately, they may not say it today, ultimately before december 31st willing to give, but they have to get something and that something i think winds up being specifics on the entitlement cuts that president obama has laid out or more entitlement cuts, but something. i think john boehner has to go back to his members and say look, president obama won the election, polling suggests we republicans lose if we go over the cliff, and i got this one thing that's going to mitigate your unhappiness over the fact that we're moving up rates on the wealthiest americans. he needs the third part to sell the whole package. >> and david, there is a jobs report today which sort of mixed news for everyone. it's a good number, down to 7.7%, unemployment, 146,000 new jobs added but the downside is that fewer people were in the labor force a lot fewer, because people gave up on even trying. >> i think this is one of the more provocative questions and get to it on sunday,
got elected on this time and what was most present in the populous mind is he needs to stay strong on what he was elected on and what he said he was going to do. host: this is from the facebook page. the question is, what do you think the president pose a number one priority should be. brian is joining us from texas on the republican line. caller: good morning. i am down here in texas and we voted the other way. the number one thing i see is jobs. you have economic growth, you have money to in the system moving. getting to the people that need it, not the people sitting in washington, d.c. i was just listening to what mr. obama was hanged and all of the things he promised in 2008, and now with a new election, and demanded, raising taxes and $1.60 trillion in texas. how is that going to help anybody? people do not have the money now. where are we going to get it? coming from the government, everybody thinks that are entitled to something. thank you for the call. the top solution is to break the congressional gridlock. north dakota on the democrats' line. caller: good morning. the nu
. we talked about this before the election, andrea. the election was supposed to tell us something about what the american public wanted. president obama did win the election. you know, an event has happened as part of the many months where the public comes down on this. >> luke russert, john boehner did yesterday come out with their proposal, the house proposal. is that a nonstarter or move the ball a little bit? >> i would say it's a nonstarter for the white house, but it moves the ball a little bit in the sense it gives us an idea of what the house gop conference would be willing to accept and that is really to put it in place, caps, specific numbers, that could be worked on next year. essentially you're going to bank specific things the white house would give. perhaps an increase in the medicare age. perhaps a change in the cpi in terms of how social security is doled out. the idea that's what the plan would possibly look like. that was a movement more towards the center. as president obama said it's unacceptable. when i was walking over here i spoke to a senior republican sena
netanyahu, the coming election, iran and many other subjects. stay with us. >> rose: ehud olmert is here. he was prime minister of israel from 2006 to 2009. he left office under the shadow of allegations of corruption. in july he was acquitted of two major charges and found guilty of one minor one. some have suggested this paved the way for a political comeback. he has not announced whether he intends to run in the upcoming israeli elections. n january, 2013. benjamin netanyahu is a strong favorite to remain prime minister. whatever happens in the elections, israel faces enormous challenges. on thursday last week, the united nations general assembly voted to recognize palestine as a non-member state. the cease-fire with hamas in gaza is fragile and temporary. the possibility of a nuclear iran has been called an existential threat to israel and throughout the middle east dictatorship which is could once be relied on to ensure israel's security are being replaced by unpredictable populist movements. i am pleased to have ehud olmert back at this table. welcome. >> thank you. >> rose: do you dis
on the egyptian elections. >> good morning everyone. thank you, bob, for that introduction and thank you all of you for coming out early this morning for what i think will be a lively debate. we are going to be asking the question if democracy is to triumph in the middle east, victories at the ballot box are inavoidable and essential. this is the motion we will be debating in the intelligence-squared format per requests from our panelists who have done this once already -- they have had a practice round. they have not had a chance of doing this, but i suspect, had probably had several scotches and talked about ways to defeat their foes. we know that this is a time of revolution in the middle east. it started with a fruit sell seller in tunisia and toppled a 230-year dictator that spread to egypt and the egyptian revolution was concern to the united states. egypt has long held incredible importance to u.s. policy in the middle east. the u.s. reaction to that revolution was unclear. there were some that said this was a good thing that this would only lead to democracy. there were others who in
the fiscal cliff. right after the election wall street dropped 5% when everybody suddenly focused on the fiscal cliff and realized that this was a problem. but since then it's kind of bumped along at this sort of level. i don't think wall street is at all sanguine about the idea that if we went over the fiscal cliff, life would go on as we know it and everything would be fine. >> one of the things that was really interesting to me to bear out that point is ken conrad yesterday who's been so down, i mean, he's leaving the senate. he's done this for seven years. they can't produce deals. and yesterday when i interviewed him, joe, he said i think we're going to make this. i think the boehner offer had significant indicators that something here is going on, and they're going to come together. >> also, kent conrad, a guy -- i've loved him for a long time, deficit hawk. they haven't allowed him to put a budget out for years. he's growing frustrated. i'm sure he's going to be glad to leave. but i was surprised by that as well. you see also, sam stein, republicans are now starting to real
of taiwan. the taiwanese had a presidential election underway, and the chinese were using a not too subtle way of explaining to them what they wanted the outcome of that election to be. thises was an unacceptable form of military coercion and both the general and i agreed that a strong response was needed by the united states, something more than a diplomatic letter of protest. after some discussion we agreed to send two carrier battle groups to taiwan. within an hour the president had approved our recommendation and before the day was over, though carrier battle groups were underway steaming to taiwan. at a press conference the next day, i was asked would i not fear this would lead to military clash with china. i said, i was not concerned of that. and when asked why, i said, i think, well, because we have the best damn navy in the world. this was not an extravagant or hyper bolic statement t. was simply a statement of fact. it was a fact that not only i knew. it was a fact which other nations understood. even one carrier battle group had more military fire power than any other nation's e
debate over whether government bailouts can be bought with political report in an election. a detroit lawmaker demands for city be saved from the financial brink because it supported obama and last month election. also, bob costas offered a clarification of sorts on his controversial comments about america's gun culture and a murder suicide involving an nfl player. he is not backing down. we will look at where this argument goes coming out. one of the country's largest teachers unions is now coming under fire for using what one person called vicious and vile warfare to discuss the virtues of taxing the rich. we will play the video and debate what kind of message this ascending. >> the 1% said don't worry, this is good for you because it will trickle down from us to you. someday you will be rich and someday you will be rich and these rules will be your rules too. fancy water. i've gotine grams of protein. that's three times more than me! [ female announcer ] ensure clear. nine grams protein. zero fat. in blueberry/pomegranate and peach. is efficiently absorbed in small continuous amoun
it seem to you that the president feels as though he has some leverage here? he won the election, right? >> he did. >> maybe that accounts for what's in his proposal. >> yeah. this is clearly a different president obama than the one we saw during the debt ceiling negotiations or even after the midterm elections in 2010 when he felt a little weakened and there was the extension of those bush tax cuts for the wealthy. so i think when you're seeing here is a president who put this on the table, trying to please his base, okay? which got him elected after all. saying, this is my wish list, this is in a perfect world, this is what i would do. i don't think anyone at the white house expected the republicans to say, oh, thank you mr. president, yes, this looks lovely. let's go on and work on a deal. no, that's not what it was. the white house -- this is alfonse gaston a little bit here. and so they're waiting for the republican response. and what they're really talking about, brooke, is getting some kind of a first step. a down payment. ironically they all know what -- in the big picture needs
. >> republicans have move add great deal. who was the first person right after the election, the speaker went down and provided revenue. we had not heard that before. when has the president offered the spending cuts? that is the hold up. >>reporter: still fighting over revenue and spending cuts, that is where we started the debate. last night when they had a congressional holiday party at white house we are told that speaker boehner did not go through the receiving line so, basically at this moment they are not talking directly. that does not sound like they moving the ball forward. >>shepard: in public. >> a strike at major ports in california could make it harder to find gifts this holiday season. we will have an update on negotiations. and iran military leaders say they captured a united states drone. again. but the united states says hang on, iran, so what is this thing the iranians are showing on iranian state tv? that is ahead. [ female announcer ] the humana walmart-preferred rx plan p-d-p gives you a low $18.50 monthly plan premium... and select generic hypertension drugs available for onl
't know whether you are ready to start thinking about america's next presidential election. a new poll shows who people say they would back to succeed president obama. also, we'll show you how a couple of possible republic candidates are already putting together the framework for 2016. >> the old ways won't do. we need new thinking and renewed efforts from all americans. >> big government is not effective government. big government has never worked. >> you will see how two potential presidential hopefuls are laying out their vision for their party's future, that's next. [ male announcer ] with 160 more miles per tank, the distances aren't getting shorter. ♪ the trucks are going farther. the new 2013 ram 1500. ♪ with the best-in-class fuel economy. engineered to move heaven and earth. ♪ guts. glory. ram. [ "the odd couple" theme playing ] humans. even when we cross our "t"s and dot our "i"s, we still run into problems -- mainly other humans. at liberty mutual insurance, we understand. that's why our auto policies come with accident forgiveness if you qualify, where your rates won'
duly elected leadership are built on more stable foundation this can be substantial but brutal ties the u.s. maintains with the hosni mubarak regime in egypt or yemen. nowhere in the region is the struggle against dictatorship more vital than in syria. over the past 20 months it has become abundantly clear that with assad in power there is no possibility, none whatever, for democratic process in syria. for years syria has been one of the most repressive countries in the world according to the state department rights reports, analytical studies by freedom house. political dissidents were routinely in prisons or disappeared and journalists were silenced. human-rights activists operated underground living in constant fear of the dreaded -- mr reuel marc gerecht 23 -- assad was cast by many as a, quote, reformer but his terrible treatment of his own people should have been a strong indication of what he was really all about. callie government treats its people the true testament to its character. callie government treats its own people in vindication of how it will act on the world stag
is relentlessly negative, but it comes at an interesting moment both for iran, which has apartmently elections next june, typically during periods of time when there is that democratic process. there's even greater and international scrutiny on iran's human rights record. trying to prevent the iranian nuclear program from arriving at the point where they're actually able to produce a weapon, and how you tie an antiproliferation policy with a human rights policy is an issue that is often been difficult for policymakers to reconcile. so, why don't i quickly just open it up. maybe i'll start with marina, since your experience at this is so personal, and maybe ask you just on a very basic level whether you think life for ordinary iranians has gotten better or worse? the last few years, and just give us a kind of -- your best sense of what the human rights landscape looks like today versus, say, five years ago or a decade ago. >> well, i guess this all depends on how much people know here about how bad, the absolute disregard for human rights iran is in general. i don't know how much you know actua
. susan rice's appalling words when she put election politics ahead of stopping the again side in rwanda. before that tweet was deleted. a 2002 article claims rice said this. if we use the word again side and are seen as doing nothing, what will be the effect on the november congressional election? our foreign affairs reporter is out front tonight. elise, does the criticism against rice add up, do you think? >> i don't think 100%, soledad. susan rice was director for u.n. affairs at the national security council at the time of the again side, the rwanda again side. that office dealt more with the united nations than with africa, even though the united nations was dealing with the issue. at the time it was a working level staff position. her first in government, ambassador rice could make announcements at that level, but wouldn't be involved making an important decision getting involved militarily in rwanda. president clinton said he made the decision, it was the greatest mistake of his presidency, and ambassador rice travelled to rwanda after the again side. she said seeing the ground li
the synopsis there. >> reporter: the president's position, all along, has been he was elected to establish the democratic institutions after the 2011 revolution. he said he inherited the legislature and announced decrees to push through with the process of forming a constitution of establishing a parliament. and avoiding what he called the impediment of the old judges and the remnants from the mubarak regime who wanted to block his way. then you have opposition factions who described that process as a power grab, as the president's attempt, as the muslim brotherhood's attempt to month onnize power. they are very concerned, down the road an islamist-led government could use the constitution to deny them the right. they don't want to vote on this draft constitution. that's why they're out here protesting at this hour. >> reza, as always, appreciate your reporting from sicairo. >>> strong warning for syria's president not to use chemical weapons against his own people. nato secretary-general said the use of such weapons would result in an immediate reaction, his words. he described the syrian
? election coming up? what happened in the u.n.? what's the feeling there? >> well, certainly the israelis have made no secret of the fact that this is a direct punitive measure for what happened at the u.n. last thursday where, of course, the palestinians managed get an upgraded status there in the u.n. general assembly going to nonmember observer state. of course, the word state there is the operative one for the palestinians. the palestinians now say they do, in fact, have a state which is a taertory that is defined as the west bank, gaza, and east jerusalem. so, therefore, the palestinians are saying that this obviously would make the implementation of this state all but impossible because they say it would be impossible for them to even reach their capital that they want to have, which is, of course, east jerusalem. this is certainly a measure that's cause aing lot of international controversy. you were saying that great britain and france have already put out staunch statements aimed at the israelis. the israelis are saying, yes, all these countries have voiced their concern. they're
about even out on the campaign trail and the white house believes that, you know, the president was re-elected on that message, so the majority of americans agreed with him, and so this is really a nonstarter for democrats and for the president. they believe that the only way to really pull in revenue here is to go after wealthy americans, majority of americans won't be impacted. he wants those bush era tax cuts extended for middle class americans but believes that those upper income americans need to pay more. republicans though are resisting because they believe that what you're doing here is penalizing the very people who are the job creators, the ones who are sitting on the sidelines and won't invest, and if they have their taxes go up, they'll be impacted, won't be able to put more money into the economy, won't be able to help turn the economy around. so that really is sort of the big sticking point. the white house refusing to budge from it at this point. we'll see where it goes in the next coming days. >> topic two, that is that the president is meeting with the leaders of the national
type of constitution in which the people can have a say in electing their government. and where the countries then are put on a more stable footing. because once that goes, then what? so this is fantastically difficult. once you lift the lid off these very repressive regimes and out comes all this religious and tribal tension, we have to find a way to stabilizing the situation and bring the bloodshed to an end. >> elsewhere in the region, egypt right now, we're seeing these protesters, these anti-mohammed morsi protesters moving closer and closer towards the presidential pass palace in cairo. they're concerned about what morsi is doing as far as democracy in egypt. how worried are you about the situation in egypt? >> i think egypt is key to the region, so the answer is, you've got to be extremely worried when you see instability affecting egypt. this is, again, the birth pangs of proper democracy in some ways, but this struggle is immensely important. obviously what's important in these countries where they've moved to a democratic system is that there is a clear understanding t
't, no. she's a leftist in her politics, she's a celebrity who supported him in his re-election, and she's a monster to work with. are those not diplomatic characteristics that we'd welcome in someone who goes to london as our ambassador? i'm joking, obviously. megyn: well, you list the accurate, you know, the stuff you said about her is reportedly true. i mean, she's notorious for being difficult to work with and so on. but all the presidents do this. this is what they all do. if you raise a lot of money for me and i'm running for president, you're going to be an ambassador. that's half the reason people do it. >> however, president obama back in '08 when he first became president, he said he was going to appoint more professionals with diplomatic experience to the service. since then he has appointed 59 ambassadors, 40 of which have no diplomatic experience -- megyn: but she is, she is half british. >> so what? [laughter] megyn: that is a fulfillment of his promise. >> wait a minute, she might be up for ambassador not just to england, but to france. megyn: oh. >> i suppose being britis
elections taking place in japan on the 16th and south korea on the 19th of this month. well within the range of this test that is scheduled to come in the coming days. influencing their neighbors and influencing politics and testing new ground with what would a second-term approach be with obama. bill: this is what we believe to be the ultimate range. 5,000 to 6,000 kilometers. 3,700 miles. china to the west here. in japan well within range of north korea were to be successful in developing this launch mechanism. here is hawaii. that's outside the range of the 6,000 kilometers. the question then begs how realistic is it that north korea would be a threat to the united states? >> through pro live raig they could be a threat to the united states. and if they were to hit our allies in the near range. in the south and also japan. those are the near-term risks. but proliferation could occur at any time. they were able to reach to hawaii ... bill: history shows they are not very good at this. are they getting better? >> only more tests will tell. you are correct history has shown it's been embarra
. rick warren tweeted this. susan rice's appalling words when she put election politics ahead of stopping the genocide in rwanda. before that tweet was delete ed -- a 2002 article that claims she said this. if we use the word genocide and are seen as doing nothing, what will be the effect on the november election? elyse, does the criticism against rice add up do you think? >> i don't think 100%. susan rice was director for u.n. affairs at the national security counsel at the time of the genocide. the rwanda genocide. now, that office dealt more with the united nations than with africa, even though the united nations was dealing with the issue. at the time, it was a working level staff position. her first in government. ambassador rice could make announcements, but wouldn't be involved in making such an important decision about getting involved militarily in rwanda and president clinton said he made the decision. it was the greatest mistake of his presidency. and susan rice traveled to rwanda shortly after the genocide and said seeing the horrors of rwanda, the ground littered with hundred
interview since the election, president obama rejected a proposal from house speaker john boehner. he spoke on bloomberg television. >> unfortunately the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. i'm happy to entertain other ideas that the republicans may present. but we are not going to simply cut our way to prosperity or to cut our way out of this deficit problem that we have. we're going to need more revenues. in order to do that, that starts with higher rates for the folks at the top. >> reporter: the president did say today he would consider lowering rates again for the top two percent next year as part of a broader tax overhaul. the house republican plan envisions $2.2 trillion in deficit reductions over the next decade. $800 billion would come from new revenues but with no hike in tax rates for top earners. instead the plan relies on $1.2 trillion in reduced spending including $600 billion from changes in medicare and medicaid. at the white house today, the president met with a bipartisan group of governors pressing his own plan for deficit reduction. that proposal, $1.6
is actually in a stronger position in his caucus than when he was elected two years ago. how is he doing, do you think? >> well, i think he's in a stronger position because republicans feel like they're in a weaker position. i think a lot of republicans who might prefer a different leader don't feel they have the luxury of that right now. in fact, even congressman kantor and others, who boehner didn't think he could count on the last time around, are being supportive. republicans are trying to calculate how much they have to give in now and is there a way to fall back with the idea of being able to move ahead in a more aggressive way next year. that's why you saw the president in a very preemptive way trying to rule out the idea of tying talks to next february to raising the debt ceiling. >> alan simpson, the co-chair of the president's deficit commission, was on the "today" show this morning and he said all this talk about either side being able to go off the cliff is ridiculous. let me play that for you. >> when you have leaders of parties and people from the administration saying i think
get past this. charlie gasparino and i have argued this. one of the consequences of the election the president will probably get his way raising most rates. melissa: right. >> i'm not saying i'm a fan. let's get past that, let's make it happen. republicans realize you lost election you didn't suddenly lose your backbone. this should be precursor getting serious tax reform and spending cuts, cuts as you point out melissa is the wrong term. they're talking about slowing the growth of spending. that is very big difference. melissa: right. >> i think the fact we see a deal largely absent any of that spending stuff, the other day i had the chairman of the congressional black caucus on. neil, we have to leave social securitt alone, medicare alone, medicaid alone. then what? so i think we have to get back to the then what stage. that's why i argued we shouldn't look at this with just the deadline in perspective. melissa: right. >> but what we do to meet that deadline. melissa: to lori's point what has gotten lost in all this discussion is growing the economy. that is what really would s
of the frustration. i think it probably would have won the election, maybe this would not have happened. now, with what we have seen, with the fiscal cliff, it is virtually impossible. i think that senator demint can do more running the heritage foundation the way she would like to rather than sitting in the senate. dagen: does this also speak to him resigning from the senate, the power of the tea party, perhaps? >> i do not know it is the waning power of the tea party. i spoke with senator demint out and he feels that we have to do a better job with that. i believe that he thinks he can take the heritage network, and they do have operations around the country, at the state level, find out what works at the state and local level. there are models, social policy, education, welfare that have had some success out in the country that reflects conservative ideas. match that with the researchers in washington that to the policy work for heritage. connell: i think a lot of people will hear or read about this today and think about the conversation we have been having about the future of the republi
, as the first popularly elected chief executive of egypt in its 3,000 year history. in a year of being in office, he said, the courts can not everrule me and no one can sue me and no one can second-guess me and what i say is the law. while he did that, he got the legislature, which was elected with him to write a new constitution without debate or input and against the rules of the present constitution and he is just putting it out there for the public to vote on. why are the judges so upset? the egyptian system of judges is similar to ours and to the british system, and judges can say to the government, that is unconstitutional. can you not do it. not in the islamic world which is what the constitution will have. their goal is an oath that is any dealt to shiria law, not rights of divided powers. >>shepard: egypt is the most powerful because of the numbers, 80 million people in egypt, they are overseeing so much of what is happening including the peace treaty of sorts between hamas and the palestinians and the israeli government and if egypt is in that sort of turmoil, the world is a more shaky
? >> we have no alternative. there was an election in egypt. no one should be shocked that the muslim brotherhood is trying to impose shariya law. whatever is in this constitution, and my friend here is absolutely right in his assessment, but let's remember, this constitution has to be interpreted by a legislature that is going to be dominated by even more extremist islamists. i would not be giving us too much comfort level here with what is essentially an islamist-dominated constitutional framework when you get finished with the parliament interpreting this constitution over the next few years, you're really going to have a lot to worry about. >> eric, let me turn back to that issue that the ambassador is talking about. what religious freedom will there be for non-islamic believers, for christians jews, will there be latitude for them to pursue their faith and under what constraints? >> well, the constitution actually says that christians, jews, and muslims will be governed in personal issues like marriage, divorce and death by their respective it was. but the constitution says that
that has to do with coal. democrat, republican, marxist, whatever. whoever you would elect from west virginia they're going to vote a certain way on coal. and the fact that we now have this incredibly distributed development because of the fracking boom means a lot of different places now are geographically playing. that goes two ways. one way is we produce more senators from the state of west virginia and how they vote. the other is we produce this broad grassroots activactivism. >> look at this last election. why was president obama as muted as he was about climate and about oil and gas and coal production? well, virginia, colorado, ohio, pennsylvania. these are -- >> michigan. >> the way our electoral college is, we only worry about ten states invested in oil and fwas production. >> somes back to the economics as well. i look at my home state of pennsylvania where we had the early stages of huge boom of marcellus shale. hundreds of wells deployed. some companies are down to a couple wells. why? because the price has plummeted. the reason it's relevant to the politics is if this is
during the election. is he dialing back the rhetoric now? >> this was ryan's first speech since the election. both he and rubio seemed to be talking about how the republican party needs to be a party that's more inclusive, helping those in the lower associatio economic levels to rise up and prove their standing. both of them, ryan specifically talked about how he was proud of the campaign and that he mitt romney ran this past year. both men seemed to be critical of romney's controversial comments that 47% of the nation is beholding of the government and feels that the government is responsible to take care of them. take a listen to what both men said. >> both parties tend to divide americans into our voters and their voters. let's be really clear. republicans must steer far clear of that trap. we must speak to the aspirations and the anxieties of every american. >> i've heard it suggested that the problem is that the american people have changed. too many people want things from government. but i'm still convinced that the overwhelming majority of our people, they just want what
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